Feeling Stuck With a Client? 3 Ways Your Documentation Can Save the Day

We've all been there. That moment in session where you realize you've had this same discussion with your client before and it ended up nowhere. That moment you see a family or couple bringing up exactly what they seemed to have already worked through. That moment you find yourself searching in your mental toolbox but come up empty-handed.

That moment where you have nothing to say and are having difficulty finding hope in the situation yourself.

While these situations are uncomfortable and often disconcerting, they hold huge potential for growth and change. But as with most obstacles that seem like a 12 foot wall, these situations usually require a different strategy in order to overcome.

What's the awesome strategy I have for you in these difficult clinical situations?

Do a review of your client's file.

Before you stop reading, let me explain!

Usually when you come across these clinical scenarios it's after you've done some work with your client. These situations don't typically pop up in week one or two because you're getting to know your clients, they're motivated to change and your plethora of clinical tools are at your disposal. 

But for those times when it's months later and your toolbox hasn't proved as helpful as it normally is, this little trick can be a game changer. 

Because now you are looking at your client with different, more experienced eyes. 

Have you ever had a situation happen where things weren't making sense and then someone offered you some insight... and when you looked back on things you realized all the signs were there early on but you just couldn't see them yet? That's what your documentation can do for you, offer that critical insight.

1. Go back to the very beginning.

Look at your client's intake paperwork. How did they present when they first came in? What did they identify as their main problem? Did they identify goals? 

Also notice if anything seems missing. Perhaps their original paperwork denied substance abuse but you discovered otherwise later on. Perhaps they noted a happy family situation but have talked about nothing but being unhappy in their marriage for the last three months.

Is there anything that pops out at you as unusual or noteworthy now that you know client more? If so, perhaps there is something you can bring up in your next session to change the cycle of repetition or feeling stuck.

2. Evaluate your treatment plan.

Do you have a treatment plan with your client? If not, this is a great time to start one! Talk about their goals, ways in which they feel they have progressed and what they would like to see happen in the future. 

And whether or not you already have a treatment plan, this is a great time to ask about how counseling is going. Do your clients feel things are going well? Does it feel like anything is missing?

If you've already got a treatment plan going, bring that out in session to check in. Are you both on track? Does this plan still make sense? Are there things either of you could be doing differently to help achieve these goals?

Make it a conversation but don't be scared to actually have a treatment plan written out and share it with your clients. This is where the paperwork can be a great catalyst for insight.

3. Review your notes from day one.

Lastly, start with the very first note in your client's file and read through chronologically. What stands out to you? What progress has been made? 

Any topics you find coming up again and again? What were the plans related to those topics? Was there follow through on any homework or plans?

Try to be as open in this process as possible. There may be something that jumps out at you right away that you've never noticed before. There may also be behavior you realize you're enabling or something clinical you realize you've missed and should address.

Really focus on conceptualizing your client's case and how to best meet their needs. This will certainly bring up questions or ideas you can address with them in the next session.

"But Maelisa, I did this and realize my notes are so minimal they don't really give me much information."

That's okay! First, take that as valuable information and adjust your note writing a bit (from now on) to include a tad more detail. Second, ask your client to help you fill in any gaps! Not literally on paper, but start your next session with an overview.

Ask your client about any sessions they found particularly meaningful or any times they felt resistant to things you discussed. Perhaps you can create a "best of" list or a "most helpful" and "least helpful" list. This is a non-threatening way to talk openly about what works and what doesn't and to review treatment overall.

If you're feeling stuck with a client and try this technique out, let us know in the comments below! And if you want more help on using your documentation as a clinical tool, check out my upcoming workshops or try using my paperwork packet. Sometimes it takes a little trial and error so be kind to yourself but keep at it. Your clients will thank you.